Dublin restaurant menu from 1907. North Wall Dublin

Just came across this interesting photo of a menu from the North Western Hotel, North Wall Dublin. Included are glimpses into the fine interior and what would have been a very busy terminus in the late 19th century into early 20th century. For your 3 shillings and 6pence you were treated to such delights ranging from Consomme Julienne, Cream Bavaroise and apricots, to pigeon, lamb and sole. Considering it was 1907, I can imagine a recreation of that menu happening in a Dublin eatery of today? I wonder! A fascinating snippet of fine dining of old Dublin.

1907 menu dublin

Pic courtesy of NYPL and for more information on the building history visit here:

http://archiseek.com/2010/1884-irish-rail-offices-north-wall-quay-dublin/

Me: markjenkinsis@gmail.com

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Chadwick’s entrance, Thomas St. Dublin

Quick post about the entrance to Chadwick’s builders providers on Thomas Street. The distinctive archway has been there since the late 19th century and would be known colloquially as Kelly’s timber yard. Before that it was the Dublin city saw mills. Joseph Kelly’s business was prosperous and he owned various plots of land in Dublin. One he sold to businessmen who had returned from America and after buying the land they built what is now “Washington Street” off the South Circular Rd. The premises covers a much older side of Dublin too as it was the site of an old Norman graveyard and it is believed that Ailred the Great/Ailred the Palmer is buried there. Ailred, of viking/ostman decent, built the first hospital of Dublin on the site of John’s Lane church after a visit to the Holy Land inspired him to build a priory and charitable institution. He brought back a palm frond from his trip so was then known as Ailred the Palmer! So next time you’re passing on Thomas St. think of all the hidden histories that are dotted about the hugely historic area.

thomas street chadwicks timber yard dublin irish

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Thomas Moore, The Bard of Erin (1779-1852)

On February 25th in 1852 “The Bard of Erin” Thomas Moore died. He is greatly under-appreciated for his songs, poetry, biographical works and contribution to the history of Ireland. His birthplace at 12 Aungier St would be known to many as J.J. Smyths the bar and jazz venue. It was redeveloped some years ago although it still notes at the front that it was the place of his birth.

moore tavern

He attended the famous Samuel Whyte school on Grafton Street and although Catholic, was allowed to attend Trinity College subsequent to the catholic relief act in 1793, and in college became good friends with Robert Emmet. After studying at Trinity he went on to London and later took up a post he was offered in Bermuda. During his time there the people considered him their laureate, as his talent began to show. In the early years of the 19th century with support he set about collating and publishing the Irish Melodies, which would become his most popular works, released in several volumes over numerous years. When you consider the equivalent in Scotland of Moore would be Robert Burns, the relative praise he gets in Ireland is poles apart.

Works such as the poem “The meeting of the waters”(Avoca, Wicklow) are well knownand “The Last Rose of Summer” has been and is still covered by many artists. His statue in Dublin, although in a busy area on Westmoreland St. is not in an ideal place and in front of what used to be public toilets. Luas works mean a temporary removal of the statue anyway it was somewhat obscured previously. Which wasn’t the case in earlier pics of the spot:

thomas moore statue 1910

Some of Moore’s relatives are buried in St. Kevin’s graveyard in Camden Row, Dublin, although he himself settled and passed away in Wiltshire, south west England. When birthdays of past Irish greats come around or anniversaries they are usually prominent in online media but hopefully in the future there may be a revival of interest in Thomas Moore and his legacy.

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Footage: Mary and Annie MacSwiney hunger strike Mountjoy prison 1922

Footage of the sisters Mary and Anne MacSwiney, on hunger strike in Mountjoy Prison. Mary was one of the founders of Cumann na mBan, and she and her sister Annie set up a school in Cork based on the same teaching principles as the likes of St. Enda’s in Dublin. In the year following her brother Terence’s death, she toured America in support of the Irish cause. Mary went on hunger strike twice and this footage is from November 1922. Annie supported her outside the prison, braving the harsh elements and would not eat until she was sure that her sister had been released. Undoubtedly one of the most influential and important Irish women of the time, as part of the executive of Cumann na mBan and when elected for Sinn Fein.

 

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Remains of Nelsons pillar removed by army explosion 1966

After the initial explosion, Irish army engineers were brought in to remove what remained of Nelson’s pillar and plinth in O’Connell Street. Although taking place in the early hours of the morning many turned up to cheer and dance as the explosion took place. Windows of several premises and the G.P.O. were smashed but no individuals were injured. Nelsons head is still on display in the Gilbert library on Pearse Street.

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Housing problem solved in Clontarf! 1921

Maybe present day Dublin should take this example from Clonfarf in 1921. Houses built in a mere four weeks, and sturdy by the look of it. The difference perhaps between these and several modern Dublin builds is that I’m sure this location is not a ghost estate! Just four weeks to construct them too.

 

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Footage: Turnover tax protests 1963

Introduced as part of the Finance Act of 1963, the “turnover tax” proved a controversial piece of legislation. Throughout the course of the year there were protests, meetings and rallies in all areas of the country from those in the sales industry as it was deemed totally unworkable. The sales tax of 2.5% led to huge fears of business closures and naturally caused political controversy at the time, but strongly defended by then Taoiseach Sean Lemass. This protest by approx 1,500 women was one of several in Dublin before the implementation of the statute, with exemptions sought for certain areas of business, as can be seen by the placards on show.

 

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